William Wordsworth’s Ode on Intimations of Immortality

English: Google books. Poem's title page from ...

English: Google books. Poem’s title page from volume two, cropped and joined onto one image by User:Ottava Rima. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

When Wordsworth arranged his poems for publication, he placed the Ode entitled “Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood” at the end, as if he regarded it as the crown of his creative life.

The three parts of the Ode deal with a crisis, an explanation, and a consolation, and in all three parts Wordsworth speaks of what is most important and most original in his poetry. The Ode’s unusual form is matched by its unusual language. The stately metrical form is matched by a stately use of words. Wordsworth seems to have decided that his subjects was so important that it must be treated in what was for him an unusual manner, and for it he fashioned his own style. Because the Ode lies outside Wordsworth’s usual range, it doesn’t perhaps realize its ambitious aims. He, who had known moments of visionary splendor, found that he knew them no more, and that is a loss which no poet can take lightly, or however comforting his consolations may be, accept in a calm, philosophic spirit. But Wordsworth was so determined not to surrender to circumstances that he made his Ode more confidant than was perhaps warranted by the mood which first set him to work. Continue Reading: Romantic Era: A Comparative Study on Wordsworth’s Ode on Intimations of Immortality & Coleridge’s Dejection

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